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New Thumbtack Survey Shows Kansas Business Owners Feeling Increasingly Positive about State Business Climate. http://bit.ly/1IPMQ0L


New Survey Shows Kansas Business Owners Feeling Increasingly Positive about State Business Climate
www.kansaspolicy.org
Thumbtack.com has begun tapping its nationwide network of independent service providers and contractors to build a monthly survey—released for the first time Tuesday—tracking economic outlook sentiments and unique market challenges small business own
Sat, 23 May 2015 02:00:01 +0000
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You're telling me the "Better Service, Better Price" thing has actually been implemented - AND WORKED - in a state! https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=1812&v=RGg6w5jA_Tg


Mitch Daniels on How to Cut Government & Improve Services

Former Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels served in office from 2005 to 2013 and in eight short years accomplished more than most politicians manage in a lifetime. H...
Fri, 22 May 2015 18:04:35 +0000
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Kansas Center for Economic Growth misleads on job growth...again! http://bit.ly/1HzFfDn


KCEG misleads on job growth – again
www.kansaspolicy.org
The latest misleading claim on job growth from the Kansas Center for Economic Growth is loaded with misleading and irrelevant information; they don’t fully disclose their methodology and at this writing they have ignored our request to explain it.&am
Fri, 22 May 2015 18:00:01 +0000
Last Refreshed 5/24/2015 10:01:18 AM
Commentary
Tax burden tied to limiting spending
By: Dave Trabert
January 25, 2012
Word Count: 241

Some people think the states without an income tax are able to do so because they have access to unusual revenue streams, but fortunately that’s not true. Florida may benefit from tourism, Texas from oil, etc., but they could still have a high tax burden if they spent more. The secret to having a low tax burden is to control spending, and that’s exactly what those states do.

According to the National Association of State Budget Officers, the states with no income tax spent an average of $2,444 per-resident (total state funds) in 2010; the rest of the country spent $3,572 per-resident, or 46% more. Kansas spent $3,216 per-resident, or 32% more than the states with no income tax. Spending from total state funds excludes spending related to federal funds or from the sale of bond proceeds.

2010 General Fund spending per-resident averaged $1,590 in the states with no income tax; the other states spent $2,112 per-resident, or 33% more. At the same time, Kansas spent $1,843 per-resident, or 16% more than the states with no income tax.

The gap between Kansas spending and other states is likely even wider today; unlike most states, Kansas’ General Fund spending this year is $861 million or 16.3% higher than in 2010.  Jobs and taxpayers have been migrating to states with lower tax burdens for years. Kansas can stop the bleeding and become a magnet for jobs by controlling spending and reducing tax rates.

View the full article in the Wichita Eagle by clicking here.