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Are Kansas school districts spending all the tax money they've been given? How has this amount changed over time? Listen to learn more about the $884 million in carryover cash reserves held by Kansas school districts.


Kansas K-12 schools carryover cash reserves
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Kansas school districts have been accumulating unspent taxpayer funds even as they call for increased funding. Kansas Policy Institute President Dave Trabert talks with podcast host Paul Soutar about these funds, how they got there, what they mean to the d...
Mon, 02 Mar 2015 21:06:59 +0000
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Maybe the "one more thing" to get City of Wichita- Government going really is the opportunity of a good paying job. Kenneth N. Ciboski KMUW


The Real 'One More Thing' For Wichita
kmuw.org
In my nearly 47 years in Wichita, I have observed that city leaders have focused on that “one more thing” they think would attract and keep people in
Thu, 26 Feb 2015 15:44:34 +0000
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Let's give more kids an option. Put kids and parents back in the driver's seat of their own future!


Rally for school choice in Kansas
wichitaliberty.org
Parents and children from around Kansas rallied in the Kansas Capitol for school choice.
Tue, 24 Feb 2015 19:06:09 +0000
Last Refreshed 3/4/2015 4:08:15 AM
Commentary
Tax burden tied to limiting spending
By: Dave Trabert
January 25, 2012
Word Count: 241

Some people think the states without an income tax are able to do so because they have access to unusual revenue streams, but fortunately that’s not true. Florida may benefit from tourism, Texas from oil, etc., but they could still have a high tax burden if they spent more. The secret to having a low tax burden is to control spending, and that’s exactly what those states do.

According to the National Association of State Budget Officers, the states with no income tax spent an average of $2,444 per-resident (total state funds) in 2010; the rest of the country spent $3,572 per-resident, or 46% more. Kansas spent $3,216 per-resident, or 32% more than the states with no income tax. Spending from total state funds excludes spending related to federal funds or from the sale of bond proceeds.

2010 General Fund spending per-resident averaged $1,590 in the states with no income tax; the other states spent $2,112 per-resident, or 33% more. At the same time, Kansas spent $1,843 per-resident, or 16% more than the states with no income tax.

The gap between Kansas spending and other states is likely even wider today; unlike most states, Kansas’ General Fund spending this year is $861 million or 16.3% higher than in 2010.  Jobs and taxpayers have been migrating to states with lower tax burdens for years. Kansas can stop the bleeding and become a magnet for jobs by controlling spending and reducing tax rates.

View the full article in the Wichita Eagle by clicking here.