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Happy Birthday to Milton Friedman, the modern champion of school choice. “Improved education is offering a hope of narrowing the gap between the less and more skilled workers, of fending off the prior prospect of a society divided between the “haves” and “have nots,” of a class society in which an educated elite provided welfare for a permanent class of unemployables.” The Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice Milton Friedman Free To Choose Network
Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:10:55 +0000

Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:04:44 +0000
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"One final thought: the measure of the success or failure of these tax cuts shouldn’t just be the effect they have on the bottom line of the Kansas state budget. The measure should be the effect they have on the budgets of the individuals, families, and businesses that are residents of Kansas. In the end it’s money that belongs to them."

http://reason.com/archives/2014/07/28/are-tax-cuts-working-in-kansas


Are Tax Cuts Working in Kansas?
reason.com
Don't believe the hype you read in The New York Times.
Tue, 29 Jul 2014 14:41:13 +0000
Last Refreshed 8/1/2014 2:03:22 AM
Commentary
Tax burden tied to limiting spending
By: Dave Trabert
January 25, 2012
Word Count: 241

Some people think the states without an income tax are able to do so because they have access to unusual revenue streams, but fortunately that’s not true. Florida may benefit from tourism, Texas from oil, etc., but they could still have a high tax burden if they spent more. The secret to having a low tax burden is to control spending, and that’s exactly what those states do.

According to the National Association of State Budget Officers, the states with no income tax spent an average of $2,444 per-resident (total state funds) in 2010; the rest of the country spent $3,572 per-resident, or 46% more. Kansas spent $3,216 per-resident, or 32% more than the states with no income tax. Spending from total state funds excludes spending related to federal funds or from the sale of bond proceeds.

2010 General Fund spending per-resident averaged $1,590 in the states with no income tax; the other states spent $2,112 per-resident, or 33% more. At the same time, Kansas spent $1,843 per-resident, or 16% more than the states with no income tax.

The gap between Kansas spending and other states is likely even wider today; unlike most states, Kansas’ General Fund spending this year is $861 million or 16.3% higher than in 2010.  Jobs and taxpayers have been migrating to states with lower tax burdens for years. Kansas can stop the bleeding and become a magnet for jobs by controlling spending and reducing tax rates.

View the full article in the Wichita Eagle by clicking here.