For Kansas budget, balance is attainable
wichitaliberty.org
A policy brief from a Kansas think tank illustrates that balancing the Kansas budget while maintaining services and lower tax rates is not only possible, but realistic.
Fri, 19 Sep 2014 19:18:30 +0000
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What's the best way to create more jobs in Wichita? Come and find out on Friday at the WSU Metroplex. Free and open to the public. Yes Wichita Coalition For A Better Wichita Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce http://kansaspolicy.org/events/119824.aspx?view=c


Fostering Economic Growth in Wichita
kansaspolicy.org
A discussion on the jobs fund portion of the proposed City of Wichita 1% sales tax. Agenda to be announced.
Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:53:26 +0000
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A chance to truly understand the issues facing Wichita voters in November. What is the best way to give more Wichitans a chance to find a job? RSVP in first comment. Voice For Liberty Yes Wichita Coalition For A Better Wichita Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce http://www.kansas.com/news/local/article2006841.html


Kansas Policy Institute to host public forum on proposed job development fund
www.kansas.com
The Kansas Policy Institute, a conservative Wichita nonprofit organization, is hosting a community forum on the proposed job development fund, which is part of the one-cent-on-the-dollar sales tax that will be on the November ballot.
Wed, 10 Sep 2014 17:19:04 +0000
Last Refreshed 10/2/2014 2:03:07 AM
Commentary
Tax burden tied to limiting spending
By: Dave Trabert
January 25, 2012
Word Count: 241

Some people think the states without an income tax are able to do so because they have access to unusual revenue streams, but fortunately that’s not true. Florida may benefit from tourism, Texas from oil, etc., but they could still have a high tax burden if they spent more. The secret to having a low tax burden is to control spending, and that’s exactly what those states do.

According to the National Association of State Budget Officers, the states with no income tax spent an average of $2,444 per-resident (total state funds) in 2010; the rest of the country spent $3,572 per-resident, or 46% more. Kansas spent $3,216 per-resident, or 32% more than the states with no income tax. Spending from total state funds excludes spending related to federal funds or from the sale of bond proceeds.

2010 General Fund spending per-resident averaged $1,590 in the states with no income tax; the other states spent $2,112 per-resident, or 33% more. At the same time, Kansas spent $1,843 per-resident, or 16% more than the states with no income tax.

The gap between Kansas spending and other states is likely even wider today; unlike most states, Kansas’ General Fund spending this year is $861 million or 16.3% higher than in 2010.  Jobs and taxpayers have been migrating to states with lower tax burdens for years. Kansas can stop the bleeding and become a magnet for jobs by controlling spending and reducing tax rates.

View the full article in the Wichita Eagle by clicking here.