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Michael Moore-style "mockumentary" is political statement masquerading as documentary. High school producer to be applauded for effort, but needs to be honest about perspective. http://kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com/e/video-documentary-on-kansas-budget-short-on-facts/


Video Documentary on Kansas Budget Short on Facts
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Dave Trabert, president of Kansas Policy Institute, discusses Kansas state budget facts that were left out of a
Fri, 17 Apr 2015 02:51:19 +0000
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Happy Tax Day! H/t Reason Magazinehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeA3s77O9Yo


Remy: Best Song Ever! (Tax Code Edition)

Remy channels One Direction to help us understand the tax code. Written and performed by Remy. Music tracks and background vocals by Ben Karlstrom. Produced ...
Wed, 15 Apr 2015 19:19:39 +0000
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Wichita, Andover, and Goddard schools all set to see state aid increases under the block grant. Each district in both counties listed here...http://kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/125997.aspx


State aid to Butler and Sedgwick counties to increase under block grants
kansaspolicy.org
 Butler County schools are scheduled to receive a growth in state aid of 3.9% over the next three years through the new block grant funding system. Seven of the county‚Äôs nine districts will experience an increase in funding. Rose Hill will r
Thu, 09 Apr 2015 16:40:36 +0000
Last Refreshed 4/18/2015 4:04:38 PM
Commentary
Sales Tax About Politics Not Economics Or Education
By: Dave Trabert
December 20, 2011
Word Count: 239

Earlier this month, much was written of State Senator Carolyn McGinn's proposal to end last year's sale tax increase early. The primary justification for that tax increase was to give more money to schools. According to the Kansas Department of Education, state aid to schools went up $94 million last year, from $2.868 billion to $2.962 billion. KSDE also reports that districts' operating carryover cash balance (total less capital and debt) increased by $85 million, from $775 million to $860 million. (Districts also reported $8 million carryover in their Activity funds, which wasn't reported previously).

90% of increased state aid was used to increase cash reserves. The tax increase clearly wasn't needed. Even worse, it cost jobs. Legislators were given two independent academic studies, from KU and WSU that said increasing the sales tax would cost a few thousand private sector jobs, mostly in jobs that wouldn't be created. Sure enough, Kansas has the worse private sector job creation in the country this year and is the only state whose average annual private sector employment (through October) is below its 2010 average.

The sales tax implementation was driven by politics, not sound economic principles. It certainly didn't get to Kansas students as most of it was put into the bank. Sadly, that is too often the case in Kansas and in Washington - politics being put before providing an effective education and allowing more Kansans to find good paying jobs.