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An event to define the scope and possible solutions to Wichita's long-term water challenges.


Examining Wichita's Water Future
An event to define the scope and possible solutions to Wichita's long-term water challenges.
Mon, 21 Jul 2014 16:07:44 +0000
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“'We’re just trying to get all of these different perspectives in the same room and not in a debate format. We want to talk about if there is a problem, what is the scope of the problem and what are some possible solutions,'” said James Franko, vice president and policy director for KPI."

http://www.kansas.com/2014/07/15/3553660/community-forum-planned-on-future.html#storylink=cpy

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER: http://kansaspolicy.org/events/118507.aspx?view=c


Community forum planned on future of Wichita’s water | Wichita Eagle
www.kansas.com
The Kansas Policy Institute, a conservative Wichita nonprofit organization, is hosting a community forum about Wichita’s water future from 8 a.m. to noon on Thursday at the Wichita State Metropolitan Complex, Room 132, according to a news release.
Tue, 15 Jul 2014 16:00:24 +0000
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What are the solutions to Wichita's water challenges? Next Thursday in Wichita attend a free event to find out. Wichita city officials, Kansas Water Office, and other experts discuss.

http://kansaspolicy.org/Events/118507.aspx?view=c


Wichita Water Conference
www.kansaspolicy.org
State experts, the City of Wichita, and local leaders will gather to explore scope of Wichita's water needs and possible solutions. Confirmed speakers: Kansas Water Office, City Councilman Pete Meitzner, Wichita Dir. of Public Works Alan King,
Wed, 09 Jul 2014 18:22:06 +0000
Last Refreshed 7/25/2014 9:48:34 AM
Commentary
Sales Tax About Politics Not Economics Or Education
By: Dave Trabert
December 20, 2011
Word Count: 239

Earlier this month, much was written of State Senator Carolyn McGinn's proposal to end last year's sale tax increase early. The primary justification for that tax increase was to give more money to schools. According to the Kansas Department of Education, state aid to schools went up $94 million last year, from $2.868 billion to $2.962 billion. KSDE also reports that districts' operating carryover cash balance (total less capital and debt) increased by $85 million, from $775 million to $860 million. (Districts also reported $8 million carryover in their Activity funds, which wasn't reported previously).

90% of increased state aid was used to increase cash reserves. The tax increase clearly wasn't needed. Even worse, it cost jobs. Legislators were given two independent academic studies, from KU and WSU that said increasing the sales tax would cost a few thousand private sector jobs, mostly in jobs that wouldn't be created. Sure enough, Kansas has the worse private sector job creation in the country this year and is the only state whose average annual private sector employment (through October) is below its 2010 average.

The sales tax implementation was driven by politics, not sound economic principles. It certainly didn't get to Kansas students as most of it was put into the bank. Sadly, that is too often the case in Kansas and in Washington - politics being put before providing an effective education and allowing more Kansans to find good paying jobs.