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"School choice, it seems, should be a no-brainer. Why not give families vouchers, allowing them to make free choices for their children’s education? There’s a reason increasing numbers of inner-city activists in places like Chicago and Washington, D.C., are fighting for charter schools and voucher programs. They know choice would be better for their kids. They know the government has failed them."

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2014/08/14/the_crazy_world_of_public_schools_123654.html


The Crazy World of Public Schools | RealClearPolitics
www.realclearpolitics.com
Are America’s vast, sprawling, powerful government agencies really all that bad? Left-leaning New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, in a recent series of columns and blog posts, has...
Thu, 14 Aug 2014 15:51:55 +0000
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LIKE if you agree with the 80% of Kansans who believe that employees should have the right to decide, without force or penalty, whether to join or leave a labor union. http://www.employeefreedomweek.com/survey-results/


Survey Results | Employee Freedom Week
www.employeefreedomweek.com
National Employee Freedom Week has released a series of scientific surveys to find out how many union members want to leave their union and gauging the public’s support for employee freedom. The results were surprising.
Tue, 12 Aug 2014 15:16:37 +0000

Kansas school funding has been increasing
www.washingtonpost.com
The Aug. 1 news article “In Kansas, a deep-red ‘experiment,’ ” about Kansas’s tax reform, provided incomplete data on school funding. The base state aid data used to show a decline in school funding r...
Tue, 05 Aug 2014 14:27:30 +0000
Last Refreshed 8/22/2014 12:02:41 PM
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Posted by Todd Davidson on Friday, November 09, 2012

Kansas is number 21 according to Site Selection’s 2012 Top State Business Climate Rankings.  Getting into the top tier will require further efforts to provide quality services and a low tax burden.  

The magazine ranks each state’s business climate based on 6 criteria:

The publication's ranking is based 50 percent on a survey of corporate site selectors … and 50 percent on five criteria, three that require states to demonstrate a strong record of attracting capital investment: the state's placement in Site Selection's most recent Governor's Cup ranking of qualified projects the previous calendar year; its Competitiveness Ranking, published the previous May; and its projects logged into the magazine's New Plant Database year to date… The other two criteria are the Tax Foundation and KPMG's Location Matters analysis of state tax burdens on mature firms and on new firms. 

Kansas performance was weighed down by a poor showing in the Tax Foundation and KPMG’s study Location Matters a Comparative Analysis of State Tax Costs on Business; where Kansas’ Mature Firm Tax Index Rank and New Firm Tax Index Rank were 47th and 48th respectively.

According to Site Selection, the “most important location criteria” is the “state and local tax scheme.” Because the rankings did not take into account tax cuts passed in May, Kansas will likely see a boost next year.  

However Kansas' work is not done; the top tier states are able to deliver quality services at a low cost.  Nine out of the top ten spent less per resident than Kansas in 2011.  In order to deliver on the “most important criteria” Kansas needs to deliver quality services more efficiently.

Posted by Todd Davidson on Monday, November 05, 2012
With 31 states spending less per resident than Kansas, it’s easy to believe Kansas can deliver a pro-growth tax policy by spending more efficiently.  It turns out, most Kansans agree. Kansans seem to understand that lower taxes means more opportunities for them to succeed and the only way to have lower taxes is to have lower spending.

KPI’s Dave Trabert on the results of KPI’s statewide poll conducted by SurveyUSA:

We often hear laughter when we ask people around the state if government operates efficiently. This poll not only backs that up, but also shows that 83 percent of Kansans believe the state government could operate five to 10 percent more efficiently. Even 82 percent of participants who are government employees agree. 

These numbers are significant because in May of 2012 Kansas passed significant tax relief in HB 2117.  KPI’s dynamic analysis of those tax cuts, estimates a one-time 8.5% reduction in spending will be needed to implement the tax relief.  

If the state government can deliver a 5%-10% improvement in efficiency, as most Kansans deem possible, tax relief will make Kansas much more attractive to businesses without cuts in core services.  A win-win for all Kansans.


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