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Happy Thanksgiving and a hearty huzzah for property rights. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66QdQErc8JQ


The Pilgrims and Property Rights: How our ancestors got fat & happy

The Pilgrims founded their colony at Plymouth Plantation in December 1620 and promptly started dying off in droves. As the colony's early governor, William B...
Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:14:47 +0000
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"Swanson regards the government for which he works as 'a greedy piglet that suckles on a taxpayer’s teat until they have sore, chapped nipples...'"http://www.nationalreview.com/article/392713/hayekian-hoosier-charles-c-w-cooke


Charles C. W. Cooke - The Hayekian Hoosier
www.nationalreview.com
Editor’s Note: This article originally appeared in the November 3, 2014, issue of National Review. However talented he may be, no writer will ever be safe from his audience, for it is they who will eventually pronounce upon his meaning. Ray Bradbury once stormed indignantly out of a class at UCLA a…
Tue, 18 Nov 2014 15:32:43 +0000
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"Much has been made of the revenue decline as marginal tax rates were reduced but total tax revenue is still running ahead of inflation over the last ten years." http://kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/123094.aspx
Mon, 17 Nov 2014 15:53:11 +0000
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Posted by Todd Davidson on Friday, November 09, 2012

Kansas is number 21 according to Site Selection’s 2012 Top State Business Climate Rankings.  Getting into the top tier will require further efforts to provide quality services and a low tax burden.  

The magazine ranks each state’s business climate based on 6 criteria:

The publication's ranking is based 50 percent on a survey of corporate site selectors … and 50 percent on five criteria, three that require states to demonstrate a strong record of attracting capital investment: the state's placement in Site Selection's most recent Governor's Cup ranking of qualified projects the previous calendar year; its Competitiveness Ranking, published the previous May; and its projects logged into the magazine's New Plant Database year to date… The other two criteria are the Tax Foundation and KPMG's Location Matters analysis of state tax burdens on mature firms and on new firms. 

Kansas performance was weighed down by a poor showing in the Tax Foundation and KPMG’s study Location Matters a Comparative Analysis of State Tax Costs on Business; where Kansas’ Mature Firm Tax Index Rank and New Firm Tax Index Rank were 47th and 48th respectively.

According to Site Selection, the “most important location criteria” is the “state and local tax scheme.” Because the rankings did not take into account tax cuts passed in May, Kansas will likely see a boost next year.  

However Kansas' work is not done; the top tier states are able to deliver quality services at a low cost.  Nine out of the top ten spent less per resident than Kansas in 2011.  In order to deliver on the “most important criteria” Kansas needs to deliver quality services more efficiently.

Posted by Todd Davidson on Monday, November 05, 2012
With 31 states spending less per resident than Kansas, it’s easy to believe Kansas can deliver a pro-growth tax policy by spending more efficiently.  It turns out, most Kansans agree. Kansans seem to understand that lower taxes means more opportunities for them to succeed and the only way to have lower taxes is to have lower spending.

KPI’s Dave Trabert on the results of KPI’s statewide poll conducted by SurveyUSA:

We often hear laughter when we ask people around the state if government operates efficiently. This poll not only backs that up, but also shows that 83 percent of Kansans believe the state government could operate five to 10 percent more efficiently. Even 82 percent of participants who are government employees agree. 

These numbers are significant because in May of 2012 Kansas passed significant tax relief in HB 2117.  KPI’s dynamic analysis of those tax cuts, estimates a one-time 8.5% reduction in spending will be needed to implement the tax relief.  

If the state government can deliver a 5%-10% improvement in efficiency, as most Kansans deem possible, tax relief will make Kansas much more attractive to businesses without cuts in core services.  A win-win for all Kansans.


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