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Are Kansas school districts spending all the tax money they've been given? How has this amount changed over time? Listen to learn more about the $884 million in carryover cash reserves held by Kansas school districts.


Kansas K-12 schools carryover cash reserves
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Kansas school districts have been accumulating unspent taxpayer funds even as they call for increased funding. Kansas Policy Institute President Dave Trabert talks with podcast host Paul Soutar about these funds, how they got there, what they mean to the d...
Mon, 02 Mar 2015 21:06:59 +0000
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Maybe the "one more thing" to get City of Wichita- Government going really is the opportunity of a good paying job. Kenneth N. Ciboski KMUW


The Real 'One More Thing' For Wichita
kmuw.org
In my nearly 47 years in Wichita, I have observed that city leaders have focused on that “one more thing” they think would attract and keep people in
Thu, 26 Feb 2015 15:44:34 +0000
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Let's give more kids an option. Put kids and parents back in the driver's seat of their own future!


Rally for school choice in Kansas
wichitaliberty.org
Parents and children from around Kansas rallied in the Kansas Capitol for school choice.
Tue, 24 Feb 2015 19:06:09 +0000
Last Refreshed 3/4/2015 7:01:43 AM
KPIBlog
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Kansans Overwhelmingly Believe State Spending Could Be More Efficient
Posted by Todd Davidson on Monday, November 5, 2012
With 31 states spending less per resident than Kansas, it’s easy to believe Kansas can deliver a pro-growth tax policy by spending more efficiently.  It turns out, most Kansans agree. Kansans seem to understand that lower taxes means more opportunities for them to succeed and the only way to have lower taxes is to have lower spending.

KPI’s Dave Trabert on the results of KPI’s statewide poll conducted by SurveyUSA:

We often hear laughter when we ask people around the state if government operates efficiently. This poll not only backs that up, but also shows that 83 percent of Kansans believe the state government could operate five to 10 percent more efficiently. Even 82 percent of participants who are government employees agree. 

These numbers are significant because in May of 2012 Kansas passed significant tax relief in HB 2117.  KPI’s dynamic analysis of those tax cuts, estimates a one-time 8.5% reduction in spending will be needed to implement the tax relief.  

If the state government can deliver a 5%-10% improvement in efficiency, as most Kansans deem possible, tax relief will make Kansas much more attractive to businesses without cuts in core services.  A win-win for all Kansans.

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