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Gov't can provide quality service while saving taxpayers money.


A plan for balancing the Kansas state budget

Kansas Policy Institute President Dave Trabert presents KPI's plan to balance the state's budget without service reductions or tax increases. Trabert spoke a...
Thu, 18 Dec 2014 17:34:52 +0000
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Another reason to watch Seinfeld reruns. Economics lessons taken directly from the "show about nothing." http://yadayadayadaecon.com/clip/67/


The Soup Nazi (The Economics of Seinfeld)
yadayadayadaecon.com
The Soup Nazi makes delicious soup—so good there's always a line outside his shop. He refuses service to Elaine, and by a stroke of luck she comes across his stash of soup recipes. She visits his shop and informs him that his soup monopoly is broken, while waving his recipes in his face. Also in thi…
Wed, 03 Dec 2014 16:15:10 +0000
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Happy Thanksgiving and a hearty huzzah for property rights. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66QdQErc8JQ


The Pilgrims and Property Rights: How our ancestors got fat & happy

The Pilgrims founded their colony at Plymouth Plantation in December 1620 and promptly started dying off in droves. As the colony's early governor, William B...
Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:14:47 +0000
Last Refreshed 12/20/2014 4:06:30 PM
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10.4 Percent of Kansas' Labor Under-utilized
Posted by Todd Davidson on Monday, October 29, 2012
10.4% of Kansas' labor is under-utilized according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics U-6 measure. This number includes 156,300 unemployed, marginally attached, or involuntary part-time workers.

(Data was provided to KPI from the BLS via email on 10/29/2012)

The Wall Street Journal’s Ben Casselman explains the U-6:

The official unemployment rate uses a fairly narrow definition of “unemployed,” looking only at people who are actively looking for work. But the Labor Department also publishes a range of other rates using different definitions. The broadest and best known alternate rate, known by its Labor Department designation, U-6, includes people who want to work but aren’t actively looking and also people who are working part-time because they can’t find full-time jobs. As of September, the national U-6 rate stands at 14.7%.

More recently, the Labor Department has begun publishing similar data for states. The numbers are released quarterly on a four-quarter rolling average, so they aren’t as up to date as the state unemployment figures that are released each month. Still, they give a window into state labor markets. 

Comments:     
Posted by Guest on Thursday, November 1, 2012
This is a federal-state solution,and one we should perhaps start pushing to implement:

The school drop-out problem is a blight on the American (Kansas and Wichita) economy and society and because of this segment's poor skill levels and trainability issues the minimum wage effectively precludes them from entrance into the economy, let alone upward mobility. Employers should be allowed to keep the FICA matching portion (perhaps the whole FICA portion) for all employees under 18 and for all employees during the first 3-4 years of employment as an "education allowance" for new and poorly prepared employees (federal issue) and they should be given education funds if they also provide math, literacy and basic health and personal economics education to help them keep themselves and the public healthy and effectively manage their finances (state issue). Further, businesses could be given a property tax reduction for any space they use for such educational purposes (local-state).

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