For Kansas budget, balance is attainable
wichitaliberty.org
A policy brief from a Kansas think tank illustrates that balancing the Kansas budget while maintaining services and lower tax rates is not only possible, but realistic.
Fri, 19 Sep 2014 19:18:30 +0000
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What's the best way to create more jobs in Wichita? Come and find out on Friday at the WSU Metroplex. Free and open to the public. Yes Wichita Coalition For A Better Wichita Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce http://kansaspolicy.org/events/119824.aspx?view=c


Fostering Economic Growth in Wichita
kansaspolicy.org
A discussion on the jobs fund portion of the proposed City of Wichita 1% sales tax. Agenda to be announced.
Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:53:26 +0000
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A chance to truly understand the issues facing Wichita voters in November. What is the best way to give more Wichitans a chance to find a job? RSVP in first comment. Voice For Liberty Yes Wichita Coalition For A Better Wichita Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce http://www.kansas.com/news/local/article2006841.html


Kansas Policy Institute to host public forum on proposed job development fund
www.kansas.com
The Kansas Policy Institute, a conservative Wichita nonprofit organization, is hosting a community forum on the proposed job development fund, which is part of the one-cent-on-the-dollar sales tax that will be on the November ballot.
Wed, 10 Sep 2014 17:19:04 +0000
Last Refreshed 9/30/2014 5:04:43 AM
KPIBlog
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School Lunch Controversy Shows Problems of Centralized Planning
Posted by John LaPlante on Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Students in Sharon Springs, Kansas, have produced a YouTube sensation mocking school-lunch guidelines laid down by the federal government.In the video, students collapse from hunger while playing school sports, or even sitting in a classroom. Critics say the "Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act" is leaving students hungry by  limiting the calories they can get, and restricting their intake of protein, fats, and carbohydrates. Even so, some students and school officials say the problem, if it exists at all, is overblown. Rep. Tim Huelskamp (R-Fowler) has introduced legislation to overturn the law. He says it represents "a perfect example of what is wrong with government: misguided inputs, tremendous waste and unaccomplished goals."

He is right about that, but the controversy also illustrates the dangers of centralization. Most schools participate in the federal school lunch program, and many even often breakfast, all on money taken from local communities, cycled through Washington DC, and then returned to communities, but with federal strings attached.

As the saying goes, he who pays the piper calls the tune. Or to update that, he who buys the lunch gets to decide what goes on the cafeteria tray.

What should we do? Perhaps it's time to do away with the federal program, let states and local governments make up the difference (if they wish), and stop the idea that everything, including what goes on a high school student's lunch, should be influenced by the federal government.

Would that mean hungry kids? If the video is any indication, the new school lunch program is already producing hungry kids.
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