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"It will take a long time to wade through the 139-page ruling, but even a cursory examination makes it clear that the three-judge panel didn’t let the facts get in the way of their decision. Instead, they made what amounts to a political decision that says the Legislature must increase funding by at least $548 million to meet the Rose standards even though school districts don’t know how to measure those standards." http://kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/124008.aspx


Kansas school funding decision ignores facts in arriving at a political decision
www.kansaspolicy.org
Today’s ruling on Gannon v. State of Kansas in which the Shawnee County District Court declared school funding to be unconstitutionally low ignores a long list of facts that disprove school districts’ contentions.  The three-judge panel ma
Wed, 31 Dec 2014 17:14:11 +0000
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KPI president Dave Trabert on today's ruling in the on-going school finance litigation, "This ruling willfully ignores a long list of facts that disprove school districts' contentions. The judges may even have ignored the State Supreme Court's order that adequacy is to be determined on whether outcomes - as defined by the Rose capacities - are being met. The judges essentially dusted off their original decision that was rejected by the Supreme Court and added some new legal jargon attempting to justify their original action in arriving at what is little more than a political decision."

Stay tuned for more analysis...
Tue, 30 Dec 2014 20:26:35 +0000
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Gov't can provide quality service while saving taxpayers money.


A plan for balancing the Kansas state budget

Kansas Policy Institute President Dave Trabert presents KPI's plan to balance the state's budget without service reductions or tax increases. Trabert spoke a...
Thu, 18 Dec 2014 17:34:52 +0000
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Regulating Garage Sales....Really?
Posted by Dave Trabert on Wednesday, September 5, 2012
I just experienced a new government intrusion into free market activities...I had to buy a permit from the City of Wichita to have a garage sale at my house.  I even had to certify that "I have not held, nor has any member of my immediate family held within the last six months, a miscellaneous sale the at address listed on this form"

Really?  The City of Wichita feels the need to restrict how frequently I can hold a garage sale?  And boy, do they mean business.  "Only two sales are allowed in a calendar year for a maximum of three consecutive days.  Holding more than two sales per household in a calendar year and/or not allowing six months between sales is punishable by a maximum fine of $100 per day of violation."  Can I get in trouble if I buy something from an 'illegal' yard sale?  If so, could I cut a deal by tipping them off to the black market lemonade stand down the street?

This is really getting out of control.
Comments:     
Posted by Guest on Sunday, November 2, 2014
Imagine living in a large city where your neighbors had 24/7 garage/yard sales, with no regard to traffic & noise? I am in favor of municipal restrictions on such sales, or our neighborhoods would look like flea markets!
Paying a fee keeps such random junk sales from popping up every day. More cities have adopted measures, since there are poor people who can't pay their bills, etc. and are looking to make "quick cash" by selling household items and soft goods at their home. Unfortunately, renters seem to be the biggest problem within neighborhoods.
Homeowners, not so much. Being a good neighbor means not wearing out your welcome by attracting rodents (rats and mice) and cockroaches, by keeping your "sale" running for weeks with 24/7 exposed bric-a-brac, clothes, furniture, etc. in yards and driveways. Sometimes it makes sense to let cities to regulate resident behavior that gets out of control!
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