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Medicaid expansion discussion should be based on reality not promises of "free money" from Washington.


Patrick Parks talks about Medicaid expansion and Obamacare in Kansas
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Kansas residents who are already paying more for health insurance will also pay much more to fund an expansion of Medicaid. Patrick Parks, a fiscal policy analyst at the Kansas Policy Institute, talks about research KPI and other organizations have done in...
Fri, 20 Mar 2015 19:05:57 +0000
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Kansas' school finance system does little to serve our children. Instead it focuses on institutions. We need a student-focused, transparent formula that requires the efficient use of taxpayer money.


Legislature Considers Changes to School Funding Formula
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Dave Trabert, president of Kansas Policy Institute, talks about the state's K-12 school funding formula. The Kansas Legislature is considering block-grant funding schools for the next two years while they take a deliberative look at rewriting the formula....
Thu, 12 Mar 2015 15:10:07 +0000
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Kansas schools on track to receive $6 billion this year, setting a new funding record for the 4th consecutive year.

http://www.kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/125226.aspx
Mon, 09 Mar 2015 16:43:11 +0000
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NFIB: Small Business Concerned about Taxes, Regulations and Low Sales. Government: Have Another Subsidy (some of you)
Posted by Todd Davidson on Wednesday, August 29, 2012
A mere 5% of small businesses plan to create new jobs; a stunning revelation from a recent survey by the National Federation of Independent Business. According to the survey, small businesses' three biggest concerns are taxes, regulation and poor sales.


The game plan for small business expansion seems simple; lessen the burden of high taxes and onerous regulation. Unfortunately, those in government prefer a misguided alternative; special handouts:

The Wichita City Council could not resist the urge to give a 100% property tax abatement, worth $500,000, to a developer in exchange for an empty building.  The developer will still enjoy police and fire protection as well as paved roads; Wichita homeowners will pick up the tab for those services.

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