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"School choice, it seems, should be a no-brainer. Why not give families vouchers, allowing them to make free choices for their children’s education? There’s a reason increasing numbers of inner-city activists in places like Chicago and Washington, D.C., are fighting for charter schools and voucher programs. They know choice would be better for their kids. They know the government has failed them."

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2014/08/14/the_crazy_world_of_public_schools_123654.html


The Crazy World of Public Schools | RealClearPolitics
www.realclearpolitics.com
Are America’s vast, sprawling, powerful government agencies really all that bad? Left-leaning New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, in a recent series of columns and blog posts, has...
Thu, 14 Aug 2014 15:51:55 +0000
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LIKE if you agree with the 80% of Kansans who believe that employees should have the right to decide, without force or penalty, whether to join or leave a labor union. http://www.employeefreedomweek.com/survey-results/


Survey Results | Employee Freedom Week
www.employeefreedomweek.com
National Employee Freedom Week has released a series of scientific surveys to find out how many union members want to leave their union and gauging the public’s support for employee freedom. The results were surprising.
Tue, 12 Aug 2014 15:16:37 +0000

Kansas school funding has been increasing
www.washingtonpost.com
The Aug. 1 news article “In Kansas, a deep-red ‘experiment,’ ” about Kansas’s tax reform, provided incomplete data on school funding. The base state aid data used to show a decline in school funding r...
Tue, 05 Aug 2014 14:27:30 +0000
Last Refreshed 9/1/2014 6:17:40 PM
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NFIB: Small Business Concerned about Taxes, Regulations and Low Sales. Government: Have Another Subsidy (some of you)
Posted by Todd Davidson on Wednesday, August 29, 2012
A mere 5% of small businesses plan to create new jobs; a stunning revelation from a recent survey by the National Federation of Independent Business. According to the survey, small businesses' three biggest concerns are taxes, regulation and poor sales.


The game plan for small business expansion seems simple; lessen the burden of high taxes and onerous regulation. Unfortunately, those in government prefer a misguided alternative; special handouts:

The Wichita City Council could not resist the urge to give a 100% property tax abatement, worth $500,000, to a developer in exchange for an empty building.  The developer will still enjoy police and fire protection as well as paved roads; Wichita homeowners will pick up the tab for those services.

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