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What's the best way to create more jobs in Wichita? Come and find out on Friday at the WSU Metroplex. Free and open to the public. Yes Wichita Coalition For A Better Wichita Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce http://kansaspolicy.org/events/119824.aspx?view=c


Fostering Economic Growth in Wichita
kansaspolicy.org
A discussion on the jobs fund portion of the proposed City of Wichita 1% sales tax. Agenda to be announced.
Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:53:26 +0000
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A chance to truly understand the issues facing Wichita voters in November. What is the best way to give more Wichitans a chance to find a job? RSVP in first comment. Voice For Liberty Yes Wichita Coalition For A Better Wichita Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce http://www.kansas.com/news/local/article2006841.html


Kansas Policy Institute to host public forum on proposed job development fund
www.kansas.com
The Kansas Policy Institute, a conservative Wichita nonprofit organization, is hosting a community forum on the proposed job development fund, which is part of the one-cent-on-the-dollar sales tax that will be on the November ballot.
Wed, 10 Sep 2014 17:19:04 +0000
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Would you pay a 1% sales tax to create a "jobs fund"? Wichitans will have to make that decision in November. 19 September at WSU Metroplex to learn about the facts of the proposal, Wichita's economic trends, how incentives have worked in Kansas before, and what it takes to make an economy truly grow. Free event, open to the public.
http://kansaspolicy.org/Events/119824.aspx?view=c


Fostering Economic Growth in Wichita
kansaspolicy.org
A discussion on the jobs fund portion of the proposed City of Wichita 1% sales tax. Agenda to be announced. Speaker line-up available at Full Description.
Mon, 08 Sep 2014 15:36:42 +0000
Last Refreshed 9/18/2014 10:15:36 PM
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Kansas In The Top 10
Posted by James Franko on Tuesday, July 31, 2012
Too bad for Jayhawk fans this has nothing to do with Charlie Weis' first season on the gridiron.

Also, it is the wrong Top 10. A more apt description would be that Kansas has the 9th HIGHEST combined (state and local average) sales tax rate in the country. This according to a new study from the Tax Foundation in Washington.

As KPI fiscal analyst Todd Davidson wrote in our most recent paper on tax reform,

A higher sales tax increases the cost of a product, and like any other price increase, prompts customers to purchase that product elsewhere (even across state lines) at a lower price or cut back on other purchases to offset the price increase. Either way, state retailers suffer an economic loss that impacts their employees and customers; lower profits reduce the amount available to compensate employees and/or may result in a price increase in an attempt to offset the lost income.

What does that mean in the Kansas City area where it is very easy for people to travel across state lines to make a purchase? Say you want to be ready for the upcoming football season with a new TV and you live in Wyandotte County. BestBuy.Com has a nice looking 65" Sony flatscreen TV for $2,999.98...even Energy Star rated. A purchase certainly outside of most family budgets, but you would pay an extra $62.10 in state sales tax if  you purchased the TV at a Best Buy in KCK instead of going a few short miles into Missouri. Keep in mind, that is before any local sales taxes are applied.

$62 might not sound like to someone spending $3K on a TV, but the point is obvious. Take this in the aggregate and Kansas is potentially losing a lot of sales tax revenue because the state remains uncompetitive.

In their analysis, the Tax Foundation reminds us...

Avoidance of sales tax is most likely to occur in areas where there is a significant difference between two jurisdictions' sales tax rates. Research indicates that consumers can and do leave high-tax areas to make major purchases in low-tax areas, such as from cities to suburbs. For example, strong evidence exists that Chicago-area consumers make major purchases in surrounding suburbs or online to avoid Chicago's 9.5 percent sales tax rate.

At the statewide level, businesses sometimes locate just outside the borders of high sales tax areas to avoid being subjected to their rates. The state of Delaware actually uses its state border welcome sign to remind motorists that Delaware is the "Home of Tax-Free Shopping." State and local governments should be cautious about raising rates too high relative to their neighbors because doing so will amount to less revenue than expected, or in extreme cases, revenue losses despite the higher tax rate.

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