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Tax day discussion of Kansas' tax cuts. Looks like the economic outlook is improving. http://www.kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/116713.aspx


Rich States, Poor States: Kansas 15th Best Economic Outlook
www.kansaspolicy.org
The 2014 edition of Rich States, Poor States released today ranks Kansas at #15 for Economic Outlook and #32 for Economic Performance.  Economic Outlook is a forward-looking forecast based on each state’s standing in 15 important state polic
Tue, 15 Apr 2014 15:50:48 +0000
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"a need for charter schools to help them escape that cycle of failure and dropout." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5rdU9tiLww&list=UUNthK1nbhLRYoiCXqjih3bw


Real Charters Schools Needed in Kansas
A failed charter school and someone looking to start a charter school in Kansas can only look to Kansas City, MO and wonder what impact high-performing publi...
Mon, 14 Apr 2014 18:55:40 +0000
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"An economic system that simply doles out favors to established stakeholders becomes less dynamic and makes job growth less likely."

Want to hear more like this? Click the link in the first comment to hear Jonah Goldberg in person later this month in Overland Park. http://www.nationalreview.com/article/375309/pro-business-or-pro-market-jonah-goldberg


Jonah Goldberg - Pro-Business or Pro-Market
www.nationalreview.com
The GOP can’t have it both ways anymore.
Fri, 11 Apr 2014 15:47:16 +0000
Last Refreshed 4/19/2014 12:00:53 AM
KPIBlog
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State Government Spending Growth, 2000 - 2010
Posted by Todd Davidson on Friday, June 22, 2012

Once again, it doesn't seem unreasonable to call this unsustainable

While Kansas government spending rose 47% private sector GDP per capita only grew 8.9% over the same period.

From Nick Kasprak at the Tax Foundation.

This week's map shows the growth of state government spending over the past decade. These percentages show the growth in direct spending between 2000 and 2010, in real dollars per capita (to eliminate the effects of population growth and inflation). Oklahoma leads the pack with a 74% increase in state government spending over ten years; Alaska, whose state government only grew 17% faster than its population, is at the bottom.

The map doesn’t specify what type of spending this represents but the Tax Foundation blog says it is Direct Spending, which Census defines as Total Expenditures (for this purpose, Expenditure does not include a government's payment of its debt, or purchases of investment securities, loans it has granted, agency or private trust transactions, nor correcting transactions) less Intergovernmental Expenditures.  Direct expenditures therefore would be somewhat less than the All Funds Budget.   For 2010, Census lists Kansas’ Direct Expenditures at $12.4 billion.

Notes:

The data behind my private sector calculation comes from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (Real GDP Private Industry, Kansas) and population data from the Census Bureau.

Here's the math:

2000: ($83,338,000,000)/(2,688,925) = $30,993.05

2010: ($96,334,000,000)/(2,853,118) = $33,764.46

($33,764.46 - $30,993.05)/($30,993.05) = 8.9%

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