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State Government Spending Growth, 2000 - 2010
Posted by Todd Davidson on Friday, June 22, 2012

Once again, it doesn't seem unreasonable to call this unsustainable

While Kansas government spending rose 47% private sector GDP per capita only grew 8.9% over the same period.

From Nick Kasprak at the Tax Foundation.

This week's map shows the growth of state government spending over the past decade. These percentages show the growth in direct spending between 2000 and 2010, in real dollars per capita (to eliminate the effects of population growth and inflation). Oklahoma leads the pack with a 74% increase in state government spending over ten years; Alaska, whose state government only grew 17% faster than its population, is at the bottom.

The map doesn’t specify what type of spending this represents but the Tax Foundation blog says it is Direct Spending, which Census defines as Total Expenditures (for this purpose, Expenditure does not include a government's payment of its debt, or purchases of investment securities, loans it has granted, agency or private trust transactions, nor correcting transactions) less Intergovernmental Expenditures.  Direct expenditures therefore would be somewhat less than the All Funds Budget.   For 2010, Census lists Kansas’ Direct Expenditures at $12.4 billion.

Notes:

The data behind my private sector calculation comes from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (Real GDP Private Industry, Kansas) and population data from the Census Bureau.

Here's the math:

2000: ($83,338,000,000)/(2,688,925) = $30,993.05

2010: ($96,334,000,000)/(2,853,118) = $33,764.46

($33,764.46 - $30,993.05)/($30,993.05) = 8.9%

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