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Medicaid expansion discussion should be based on reality not promises of "free money" from Washington.


Patrick Parks talks about Medicaid expansion and Obamacare in Kansas
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Kansas residents who are already paying more for health insurance will also pay much more to fund an expansion of Medicaid. Patrick Parks, a fiscal policy analyst at the Kansas Policy Institute, talks about research KPI and other organizations have done in...
Fri, 20 Mar 2015 19:05:57 +0000
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Kansas' school finance system does little to serve our children. Instead it focuses on institutions. We need a student-focused, transparent formula that requires the efficient use of taxpayer money.


Legislature Considers Changes to School Funding Formula
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Dave Trabert, president of Kansas Policy Institute, talks about the state's K-12 school funding formula. The Kansas Legislature is considering block-grant funding schools for the next two years while they take a deliberative look at rewriting the formula....
Thu, 12 Mar 2015 15:10:07 +0000
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Kansas schools on track to receive $6 billion this year, setting a new funding record for the 4th consecutive year.

http://www.kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/125226.aspx
Mon, 09 Mar 2015 16:43:11 +0000
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State Government Spending Growth, 2000 - 2010
Posted by Todd Davidson on Friday, June 22, 2012

Once again, it doesn't seem unreasonable to call this unsustainable

While Kansas government spending rose 47% private sector GDP per capita only grew 8.9% over the same period.

From Nick Kasprak at the Tax Foundation.

This week's map shows the growth of state government spending over the past decade. These percentages show the growth in direct spending between 2000 and 2010, in real dollars per capita (to eliminate the effects of population growth and inflation). Oklahoma leads the pack with a 74% increase in state government spending over ten years; Alaska, whose state government only grew 17% faster than its population, is at the bottom.

The map doesn’t specify what type of spending this represents but the Tax Foundation blog says it is Direct Spending, which Census defines as Total Expenditures (for this purpose, Expenditure does not include a government's payment of its debt, or purchases of investment securities, loans it has granted, agency or private trust transactions, nor correcting transactions) less Intergovernmental Expenditures.  Direct expenditures therefore would be somewhat less than the All Funds Budget.   For 2010, Census lists Kansas’ Direct Expenditures at $12.4 billion.

Notes:

The data behind my private sector calculation comes from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (Real GDP Private Industry, Kansas) and population data from the Census Bureau.

Here's the math:

2000: ($83,338,000,000)/(2,688,925) = $30,993.05

2010: ($96,334,000,000)/(2,853,118) = $33,764.46

($33,764.46 - $30,993.05)/($30,993.05) = 8.9%

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