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Medicaid expansion discussion should be based on reality not promises of "free money" from Washington.


Patrick Parks talks about Medicaid expansion and Obamacare in Kansas
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Kansas residents who are already paying more for health insurance will also pay much more to fund an expansion of Medicaid. Patrick Parks, a fiscal policy analyst at the Kansas Policy Institute, talks about research KPI and other organizations have done in...
Fri, 20 Mar 2015 19:05:57 +0000
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Kansas' school finance system does little to serve our children. Instead it focuses on institutions. We need a student-focused, transparent formula that requires the efficient use of taxpayer money.


Legislature Considers Changes to School Funding Formula
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Dave Trabert, president of Kansas Policy Institute, talks about the state's K-12 school funding formula. The Kansas Legislature is considering block-grant funding schools for the next two years while they take a deliberative look at rewriting the formula....
Thu, 12 Mar 2015 15:10:07 +0000
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Kansas schools on track to receive $6 billion this year, setting a new funding record for the 4th consecutive year.

http://www.kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/125226.aspx
Mon, 09 Mar 2015 16:43:11 +0000
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Plenty of Inefficient Spending in Wichita's Budget
Posted by Dave Trabert on Friday, June 15, 2012
It's always interesting to see how government's view of the world is so much different than the private sector's.  Last week President Obama said the private sector was 'doing fine' even though there are still 6 million fewer jobs than at the beginning of the recession.  Now the City of Wichita says a 0.4% budget shortfall is 'pretty grim'.  Finding $2.4 million in a $549 million budget is barely a rounding error.

In 2011, the City spent $3.4 million on overtime.  Wichita spent $706,343 in payroll on gardeners and $822,037 on tree maintenance workers (5 supervisors for 15 workers).  Did you know the City employs a Tennis Pro for $93,972?  Add about 35% to each of those numbers for payroll tax and benefits.  Details are at available at KansasOpenGov.org

I seriously doubt that we need a Tennis Pro on the city payroll; gardening and tree maintenance are classic examples of things that can be provided by the private sector at lower costs (remember the $1 million or so saved by privatizing parks maintenance?).

It took me about 15 minutes to find these few examples.  Why is City Council and staff agonizing over closing a 0.4% budget gap?  Sounds like we are being set up for a tax increase.

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