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Michael Moore-style "mockumentary" is political statement masquerading as documentary. High school producer to be applauded for effort, but needs to be honest about perspective. http://kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com/e/video-documentary-on-kansas-budget-short-on-facts/


Video Documentary on Kansas Budget Short on Facts
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Dave Trabert, president of Kansas Policy Institute, discusses Kansas state budget facts that were left out of a
Fri, 17 Apr 2015 02:51:19 +0000
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Happy Tax Day! H/t Reason Magazinehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeA3s77O9Yo


Remy: Best Song Ever! (Tax Code Edition)

Remy channels One Direction to help us understand the tax code. Written and performed by Remy. Music tracks and background vocals by Ben Karlstrom. Produced ...
Wed, 15 Apr 2015 19:19:39 +0000
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Wichita, Andover, and Goddard schools all set to see state aid increases under the block grant. Each district in both counties listed here...http://kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/125997.aspx


State aid to Butler and Sedgwick counties to increase under block grants
kansaspolicy.org
 Butler County schools are scheduled to receive a growth in state aid of 3.9% over the next three years through the new block grant funding system. Seven of the county’s nine districts will experience an increase in funding. Rose Hill will r
Thu, 09 Apr 2015 16:40:36 +0000
Last Refreshed 4/21/2015 4:04:57 AM
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Plenty of Inefficient Spending in Wichita's Budget
Posted by Dave Trabert on Friday, June 15, 2012
It's always interesting to see how government's view of the world is so much different than the private sector's.  Last week President Obama said the private sector was 'doing fine' even though there are still 6 million fewer jobs than at the beginning of the recession.  Now the City of Wichita says a 0.4% budget shortfall is 'pretty grim'.  Finding $2.4 million in a $549 million budget is barely a rounding error.

In 2011, the City spent $3.4 million on overtime.  Wichita spent $706,343 in payroll on gardeners and $822,037 on tree maintenance workers (5 supervisors for 15 workers).  Did you know the City employs a Tennis Pro for $93,972?  Add about 35% to each of those numbers for payroll tax and benefits.  Details are at available at KansasOpenGov.org

I seriously doubt that we need a Tennis Pro on the city payroll; gardening and tree maintenance are classic examples of things that can be provided by the private sector at lower costs (remember the $1 million or so saved by privatizing parks maintenance?).

It took me about 15 minutes to find these few examples.  Why is City Council and staff agonizing over closing a 0.4% budget gap?  Sounds like we are being set up for a tax increase.

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