For Kansas budget, balance is attainable
wichitaliberty.org
A policy brief from a Kansas think tank illustrates that balancing the Kansas budget while maintaining services and lower tax rates is not only possible, but realistic.
Fri, 19 Sep 2014 19:18:30 +0000
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What's the best way to create more jobs in Wichita? Come and find out on Friday at the WSU Metroplex. Free and open to the public. Yes Wichita Coalition For A Better Wichita Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce http://kansaspolicy.org/events/119824.aspx?view=c


Fostering Economic Growth in Wichita
kansaspolicy.org
A discussion on the jobs fund portion of the proposed City of Wichita 1% sales tax. Agenda to be announced.
Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:53:26 +0000
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A chance to truly understand the issues facing Wichita voters in November. What is the best way to give more Wichitans a chance to find a job? RSVP in first comment. Voice For Liberty Yes Wichita Coalition For A Better Wichita Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce http://www.kansas.com/news/local/article2006841.html


Kansas Policy Institute to host public forum on proposed job development fund
www.kansas.com
The Kansas Policy Institute, a conservative Wichita nonprofit organization, is hosting a community forum on the proposed job development fund, which is part of the one-cent-on-the-dollar sales tax that will be on the November ballot.
Wed, 10 Sep 2014 17:19:04 +0000
Last Refreshed 10/1/2014 12:11:06 PM
KPIBlog
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Plenty of Inefficient Spending in Wichita's Budget
Posted by Dave Trabert on Friday, June 15, 2012
It's always interesting to see how government's view of the world is so much different than the private sector's.  Last week President Obama said the private sector was 'doing fine' even though there are still 6 million fewer jobs than at the beginning of the recession.  Now the City of Wichita says a 0.4% budget shortfall is 'pretty grim'.  Finding $2.4 million in a $549 million budget is barely a rounding error.

In 2011, the City spent $3.4 million on overtime.  Wichita spent $706,343 in payroll on gardeners and $822,037 on tree maintenance workers (5 supervisors for 15 workers).  Did you know the City employs a Tennis Pro for $93,972?  Add about 35% to each of those numbers for payroll tax and benefits.  Details are at available at KansasOpenGov.org

I seriously doubt that we need a Tennis Pro on the city payroll; gardening and tree maintenance are classic examples of things that can be provided by the private sector at lower costs (remember the $1 million or so saved by privatizing parks maintenance?).

It took me about 15 minutes to find these few examples.  Why is City Council and staff agonizing over closing a 0.4% budget gap?  Sounds like we are being set up for a tax increase.

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