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"School choice, it seems, should be a no-brainer. Why not give families vouchers, allowing them to make free choices for their children’s education? There’s a reason increasing numbers of inner-city activists in places like Chicago and Washington, D.C., are fighting for charter schools and voucher programs. They know choice would be better for their kids. They know the government has failed them."

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2014/08/14/the_crazy_world_of_public_schools_123654.html


The Crazy World of Public Schools | RealClearPolitics
www.realclearpolitics.com
Are America’s vast, sprawling, powerful government agencies really all that bad? Left-leaning New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, in a recent series of columns and blog posts, has...
Thu, 14 Aug 2014 15:51:55 +0000
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LIKE if you agree with the 80% of Kansans who believe that employees should have the right to decide, without force or penalty, whether to join or leave a labor union. http://www.employeefreedomweek.com/survey-results/


Survey Results | Employee Freedom Week
www.employeefreedomweek.com
National Employee Freedom Week has released a series of scientific surveys to find out how many union members want to leave their union and gauging the public’s support for employee freedom. The results were surprising.
Tue, 12 Aug 2014 15:16:37 +0000

Kansas school funding has been increasing
www.washingtonpost.com
The Aug. 1 news article “In Kansas, a deep-red ‘experiment,’ ” about Kansas’s tax reform, provided incomplete data on school funding. The base state aid data used to show a decline in school funding r...
Tue, 05 Aug 2014 14:27:30 +0000
Last Refreshed 8/22/2014 2:02:22 AM
KPIBlog
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Simple Comparisons of Base State Aid are Deceptive
Posted by Dave Trabert on Monday, May 07, 2012

Claims that Base State Aid Per-Pupil (BSAPP) has been cut back to 1990s levels are quite deceptive, as they ignore how state funding of schools has significantly changed over the years.  At one point, nearly all programs were funded out of BSAPP, but subsequent years have seen more money added on top of BSAPP for services that previously came out of the base.

Since student populations vary widely some districts receive additional money through ‘weightings’ on top of BSAPP ("At Risk, Bilingual, etc).  Quite a few ‘weightings’ have been added or expanded over the years, with the effect of reducing stress on BSAPP.  A full list of the weightings, their respective values and the complete formula is available on KansasOpenGov. 

The adjacent table demonstrates how those weightings and other state aid have changed.

In 1998, there was only $178 per-pupil in addition to BSAPP, KPERS and Bond aid.  This year’s estimate is more than 10 times that amount. 

It is correct to say BSAPP has remained relatively unchanged since the late 1990s, but that leaves out an increasingly large portion of State K-12 funding.  In 1998, BSAPP accounted for nearly all of State funding of Education (91%) while today BSAPP has been supplemented by allotments made via ‘weightings’ and now accounts for only 55% of State funding of education.

The only way to fairly compare the change in BSAPP over the years would be to deduct those items that once were paid out of the base but are now in supplemental funds (or vice versa; increase BSAPP each year on the same basis). 

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