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Gov't can provide quality service while saving taxpayers money.


A plan for balancing the Kansas state budget

Kansas Policy Institute President Dave Trabert presents KPI's plan to balance the state's budget without service reductions or tax increases. Trabert spoke a...
Thu, 18 Dec 2014 17:34:52 +0000
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Another reason to watch Seinfeld reruns. Economics lessons taken directly from the "show about nothing." http://yadayadayadaecon.com/clip/67/


The Soup Nazi (The Economics of Seinfeld)
yadayadayadaecon.com
The Soup Nazi makes delicious soup—so good there's always a line outside his shop. He refuses service to Elaine, and by a stroke of luck she comes across his stash of soup recipes. She visits his shop and informs him that his soup monopoly is broken, while waving his recipes in his face. Also in thi…
Wed, 03 Dec 2014 16:15:10 +0000
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Happy Thanksgiving and a hearty huzzah for property rights. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66QdQErc8JQ


The Pilgrims and Property Rights: How our ancestors got fat & happy

The Pilgrims founded their colony at Plymouth Plantation in December 1620 and promptly started dying off in droves. As the colony's early governor, William B...
Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:14:47 +0000
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Wichita is Home to an Ever Increasing Public Sector
Posted by Todd Davidson on Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Today the Bureau of Labor Statistics released Wichita Metro Area February employment numbers, small gains are a positive step, but yet again we see public sector employment growth outpacing the private sector.  One month is nothing to fret over but a 13 year trend can be telling, as this can only mean higher taxes on a struggling private sector.

Since 1998 the Wichita Metro Area has seen all levels government grow and grow, while private sector employment has often failed to stay above water.  The chart below indexes Wichita Metro Area employment growth in the private sector and levels of government, (any value below 100 means employment is lower than 1998 levels).

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Wichita private sector employment peaked in 2008 at 267,000, but has since lost 24,500 jobs. Only 4 of the 13 years since 1998 has Wichita employed more private sector workers than in 1998. 

All local gov't in the metro area fared better, each year setting a new record level of public employment, until shaving a few workers in 2011.

In 1998 there were 10.35 private sector employees supporting 1 local public sector employee, by 2011 that number decreased to 8.45.  Meaning a heftier tax burden must be carried by each private sector employee to support the growing local public sector.

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