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Calling all Wichitans! Want to pay higher sales taxes to fund, amongst other things, street paving and bus transit? Learn more about the proposal this Thursday at WSU Metroplex. Free and open to the public. Please register here: http://kansaspolicy.org/events/121100.aspx?view=c


Moving Wichitans in the Future: Paving and Transit Via Sales Tax?
www.kansaspolicy.org
A review of the paving and transit portions of the proposed 1% sales tax in the City of Wichita.
Tue, 21 Oct 2014 20:30:40 +0000
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Is a new tax in City of Wichita- Government the right way to maintain streets and provide bus transit? What are some other possible solutions to the problem? 23 October event to learn more. http://www.kansas.com/news/politics-government/election/article2906173.html RSVP in first comment.


KPI to host forum on transit and street maintenance components of sales tax referendum
www.kansas.com
The Kansas Policy Institute, a conservative Wichita nonprofit organization, is hosting its final community forum on the components of the upcoming sales tax referendum.
Thu, 16 Oct 2014 15:13:54 +0000
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How will the upcoming elections impact Freedom in America and Kansas? Hear Scott Rasmussen's thoughts and predictions at the KPI annual dinner on October 28 in Wichita. Register today at www.KansasPolicy.org/Rasmussen2014


2014 Elections and America's Future
www.kansaspolicy.org
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Wed, 15 Oct 2014 14:47:50 +0000
Last Refreshed 10/25/2014 11:04:31 PM
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Conflict of Interest or Height of Hypocrisy?
Posted by Dave Trabert on Monday, January 23, 2012
A recent story in the Wichita Eagle focused on comments from Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley, D-Topeka, regarding a conflict of interest for members of the House and Senate Tax Committees. After examining data gathered by the Eagle, showing that 20 of the 23 members of the House Taxation Committee and 9 of the 11 member of the Senate Tax Committee have business interests that would be exempted from state income tax under the Brownback plan, Hensley suggested that some of the members should consider recusing themselves from voting on the plan.

 “They certainly ought to at least let the general public and the rest of their colleagues know that they have a conflict of interest,” Hensley said. “We have rules in the Senate that provide for that.

“When a bill hits the floor on final action, you cannot be forced to vote if you have a conflict of interest and you announce that publicly before the vote takes place. It addresses this very kind of thing.”

It’s one thing if a piece of legislation targets a specific industry or employer, but when legislation applies uniformly as in this case, it’s simply not practical to have members of a part-time citizen legislature recuse themselves. And no one knows that better than Senator Hensley, a special education teacher in the Topeka district who routinely introduces and votes on legislation impacting public schools. Senator Hensley obviously believes he has no conflict on education issues, yet he has no problem finding fault with others who do the same as he.

It’s also noteworthy that the
Eagle story failed to mention this obvious conflict.
Comments:     
Posted by Guest on Monday, January 23, 2012
Conflict of interest arguments are only valid in the eyes of the beholder
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