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Happy Thanksgiving and a hearty huzzah for property rights. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66QdQErc8JQ


The Pilgrims and Property Rights: How our ancestors got fat & happy

The Pilgrims founded their colony at Plymouth Plantation in December 1620 and promptly started dying off in droves. As the colony's early governor, William B...
Tue, 25 Nov 2014 16:14:47 +0000
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"Swanson regards the government for which he works as 'a greedy piglet that suckles on a taxpayer’s teat until they have sore, chapped nipples...'"http://www.nationalreview.com/article/392713/hayekian-hoosier-charles-c-w-cooke


Charles C. W. Cooke - The Hayekian Hoosier
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Editor’s Note: This article originally appeared in the November 3, 2014, issue of National Review. However talented he may be, no writer will ever be safe from his audience, for it is they who will eventually pronounce upon his meaning. Ray Bradbury once stormed indignantly out of a class at UCLA a…
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"Much has been made of the revenue decline as marginal tax rates were reduced but total tax revenue is still running ahead of inflation over the last ten years." http://kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/123094.aspx
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K-12 Reform Heads To Topeka
Posted by James Franko on Wednesday, January 11, 2012
Too often in Kansas we talk a lot about how much we spend on K-12 education but not nearly enough time talking about student achievement.

Next week the House Education Committee plans to change that (at least for the day) with a series of hearings on Thursday 19 January.  Never mind the usual hearings of one person standing up and giving a canned speech.  Next week, Rep. Clay Aurand's committee will be having congressional style panels with multiple people testifying at the same time.  Hopefully allowing for a more robust discussion.  Check out the proposed speaker line up below...subject to chance, unfortunately.

9:00 a.m. – The State of Kansas Education
Dave Trabert - President of Kansas Policy Institute
Dr. Janet Barresi - Oklahoma State Commissioner of Education and member of Chiefs for Change
Mark Tallman - Kansas Association of School Boards

10:00 a.m. – Public School Reform
Natise Vogt – Walton (KS) Rural Life Center
Gary Lewis – Maize (KS) Virtual Preparatory School
Peter Groff – Visiting fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Education and the Principal of MCG2 Consulting and the former President and CEO of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools
Susan Patrick – President of International Association For K-12 Online Learning

The hearings will likely be held in the Old Supreme Court Chamber at the Capitol.

After the hearings, Dr. Barresi will present at a public lunch for legislators at the Topeka Capital-Plaza hotel.  More details to come.

Unless we start challenging the status quo, more and more Kansas kids will be left behind their peers.  Hopefully, this is the first step in the right direction.

Comments:     
Posted by Guest on Monday, January 16, 2012
Too often we jump to conclusions about what needs to be done to improve or "fix" education. Being in a review of all the scholarly literature on achievement at the moment, it is clear that there is little consensus on what makes one teacher more effective than another at imparting information and yet certain teachers are consistently more effective than others and certain schools and districts are more effective than others. Rather than make recommendations about how much to spend, how to teach or structure the learning environment what is vital is to get the incentives right. We need to reward principles who produce improved results and efficiency as measured by both current standardized tests and new tests and allow them the freedom to reward teachers who add value to their students and students who achieve the greatest gains as well as those who achieve among the highest. If the lowest performing teachers (and principals) were removed from the system, even with targeted increased class sizes, we can raise the rate of learning for most student by half a year additional learning per year. This will result in billions of dollars increase in Kansas GDP, according to extrapolations of estimates done by Hanushek and Woessmann. Proper incentives and power to the principles is the first key. Including online elements in learning also appears very promising as it is cost effective, can lower teacher work-load freeing up time to help weaker students and provide instantaneous feedback to student. Discipline is another key issue, sucking up instructional time.
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