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An event to define the scope and possible solutions to Wichita's long-term water challenges.


Examining Wichita's Water Future
An event to define the scope and possible solutions to Wichita's long-term water challenges.
Mon, 21 Jul 2014 16:07:44 +0000
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“'We’re just trying to get all of these different perspectives in the same room and not in a debate format. We want to talk about if there is a problem, what is the scope of the problem and what are some possible solutions,'” said James Franko, vice president and policy director for KPI."

http://www.kansas.com/2014/07/15/3553660/community-forum-planned-on-future.html#storylink=cpy

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER: http://kansaspolicy.org/events/118507.aspx?view=c


Community forum planned on future of Wichita’s water | Wichita Eagle
www.kansas.com
The Kansas Policy Institute, a conservative Wichita nonprofit organization, is hosting a community forum about Wichita’s water future from 8 a.m. to noon on Thursday at the Wichita State Metropolitan Complex, Room 132, according to a news release.
Tue, 15 Jul 2014 16:00:24 +0000
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What are the solutions to Wichita's water challenges? Next Thursday in Wichita attend a free event to find out. Wichita city officials, Kansas Water Office, and other experts discuss.

http://kansaspolicy.org/Events/118507.aspx?view=c


Wichita Water Conference
www.kansaspolicy.org
State experts, the City of Wichita, and local leaders will gather to explore scope of Wichita's water needs and possible solutions. Confirmed speakers: Kansas Water Office, City Councilman Pete Meitzner, Wichita Dir. of Public Works Alan King,
Wed, 09 Jul 2014 18:22:06 +0000
Last Refreshed 7/28/2014 11:01:30 PM
KPIBlog
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KC Star editorial misses the mark on tax reform
Posted by Dave Trabert on Monday, January 09, 2012
A recent column by the KC Star’s Steve Rose (available here) tried to make the case that states with no income tax are only able to do so because they have unique revenue sources. Examples he gave included gambling in Nevada, tourism in Florida and oil & gas in Texas, Alaska and other states. Fortunately, Mr. Rose didn’t do his homework.

The key to having a low tax burden and/or no income tax is not access to extra revenue; it's how much you spend. Yes, some states with no income tax have unique revenue opportunities but they could just spend more and have higher taxes like other states. Instead, they’ve figured out that they can have good quality government services AND high job growth by controlling spending and keeping taxes low.

The nine states with no income tax spent $1,767 per resident in 2009 out of their General Fund. That was 27% less than the national average and 21% less than Kansas. If Kansas had spent at the rate of the no-income-tax states, we would have spent $1.1 billion less that year.

KPI compiled research comparing the states with the highest tax burden to those with the lowest tax burdens and also those with no income tax. The low burden states dramatically outperform high burden states on job creation, gross domestic product, wage & salary distribution and domestic migration (U.S. residents moving in and out of states). The states with no income tax tend to do even better.  Check out the facts here at our tax reform page.
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