By
"It will take a long time to wade through the 139-page ruling, but even a cursory examination makes it clear that the three-judge panel didn’t let the facts get in the way of their decision. Instead, they made what amounts to a political decision that says the Legislature must increase funding by at least $548 million to meet the Rose standards even though school districts don’t know how to measure those standards." http://kansaspolicy.org/KPIBlog/124008.aspx


Kansas school funding decision ignores facts in arriving at a political decision
www.kansaspolicy.org
Today’s ruling on Gannon v. State of Kansas in which the Shawnee County District Court declared school funding to be unconstitutionally low ignores a long list of facts that disprove school districts’ contentions.  The three-judge panel ma
Wed, 31 Dec 2014 17:14:11 +0000
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KPI president Dave Trabert on today's ruling in the on-going school finance litigation, "This ruling willfully ignores a long list of facts that disprove school districts' contentions. The judges may even have ignored the State Supreme Court's order that adequacy is to be determined on whether outcomes - as defined by the Rose capacities - are being met. The judges essentially dusted off their original decision that was rejected by the Supreme Court and added some new legal jargon attempting to justify their original action in arriving at what is little more than a political decision."

Stay tuned for more analysis...
Tue, 30 Dec 2014 20:26:35 +0000
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Gov't can provide quality service while saving taxpayers money.


A plan for balancing the Kansas state budget

Kansas Policy Institute President Dave Trabert presents KPI's plan to balance the state's budget without service reductions or tax increases. Trabert spoke a...
Thu, 18 Dec 2014 17:34:52 +0000
Last Refreshed 1/31/2015 10:09:40 PM
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WILLKOMMEN - Rules and Guidelines
Posted by James Franko on Monday, January 9, 2012

Welcome to KPI's latest effort to help make Kansas a freer and more prosperous place to live and work.  (Please note the use of the German word for "welcome" because who doesn't appreciate a tip of the hat to the native language of the Austrian School of Economics.)

My name is James Franko (sorry, not the actor but this one) and I'm in charge of making sure we get this blog started off on the right foot.  To that end, our goal is to create a place to discuss the public policy questions facing our state. We believe this can be done in a courteous way that allows for all voices to be heard and respected.

With that in mind, please remember that Kansas Policy Institute is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization and is governed by rules that will prevent any comments, messages, or other content from being posted that;

  • Constitute a communication in support of or in opposition to any candidate for any public office;
  • Electioneering or lobbying communications within the meaning of applicable federal or state law.

Once again, this is to be a place to discuss, and even debate, the policy issues of the day. This does not include personal attacks, vulgarity, offensive content, spam, or links to things directly selling products. However, we gladly encourage you to post links to other blogs, media outlets, or organizations that advance the conversation and make a meaningful contribution. This means we can delete content that;

  • Is abusive, vulgar, offensive, threatening or harassing language, personal attacks of any kind, or offensive terms that target specific individuals or groups;
  • Off-topic comments or comments that promote services or products;
  • Gratuitous links to sites that could be viewed as spam;
  • Personally identifiable information such as social security numbers, addresses, and telephone numbers.

Something appearing on this blog DOES NOT constitute or imply the support or endorsement of said content by KPI, our staff, or board members. We’re trying to create the free flow of ideas and someone posting a study from the Bugs Bunny Institute for Public Policy does not mean KPI is supporting Bugs Bunny or his policy ideas.

We reserve the right, at our absolute discretion, to remove any comments we feel violate the rules outlined above or the spirit of this blog.

Lastly, while we were all riveted by the debates in Washington, D.C. about raising the debt ceiling or extending the payroll tax cut, we'll be focusing on Kansas issues.  There are plenty of other forums to debate the latest news from inside the Beltway and trust you'll find an appropriate place to make your opinion known. So, unless it deals with a direct impact on Kansas policy (e.g., Medicaid, NCLB), personal liberty, or economic freedom we'll leave those federal topics for discussion elsewhere.

Please e-mail me (james.franko@kansaspolicy.org) should you have any questions or concerns.

Comments:     
Posted by Guest on Tuesday, January 10, 2012
I commend your effort to get people talking about increasing freedom in Kansas!! If we don't take responsibility for protecting our freedom then we will lose it to those who believe they have a right to decide who gets what income and who gets what "rights"--usually defined as a living wage, a job, an education, healthcare, safety, retirement income, etc...things which are not rights at all but things people should have to provide for themselves and should be taught to provide for themselves if they want them. Life, liberty and personal property are the rights that define individual identity; it is these that should be protected. When we think that we have a right to someone else's hard earned wages, which is what is necessary to provide all the wants often referred to as "rights" that I just listed above, then we endanger, indeed violate, the protection of our own true rights. If it's alright for us to take others property to benefit ourselves through the force of government then that same reasoning will be used to take away our own property, liberty and eventually even our own life. Hopefully this site will be able to help people see the truth of this, come to their senses and rise up in protection of our actual rights.
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