For Kansas budget, balance is attainable
wichitaliberty.org
A policy brief from a Kansas think tank illustrates that balancing the Kansas budget while maintaining services and lower tax rates is not only possible, but realistic.
Fri, 19 Sep 2014 19:18:30 +0000
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What's the best way to create more jobs in Wichita? Come and find out on Friday at the WSU Metroplex. Free and open to the public. Yes Wichita Coalition For A Better Wichita Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce http://kansaspolicy.org/events/119824.aspx?view=c


Fostering Economic Growth in Wichita
kansaspolicy.org
A discussion on the jobs fund portion of the proposed City of Wichita 1% sales tax. Agenda to be announced.
Mon, 15 Sep 2014 19:53:26 +0000
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A chance to truly understand the issues facing Wichita voters in November. What is the best way to give more Wichitans a chance to find a job? RSVP in first comment. Voice For Liberty Yes Wichita Coalition For A Better Wichita Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce http://www.kansas.com/news/local/article2006841.html


Kansas Policy Institute to host public forum on proposed job development fund
www.kansas.com
The Kansas Policy Institute, a conservative Wichita nonprofit organization, is hosting a community forum on the proposed job development fund, which is part of the one-cent-on-the-dollar sales tax that will be on the November ballot.
Wed, 10 Sep 2014 17:19:04 +0000
Last Refreshed 9/20/2014 6:01:08 AM
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Tax Myth Debunked: Gov't Spending Stimulates the Economy During Recessions
Posted by Todd Davidson on Wednesday, February 06, 2013
Tax Myths Debunked, a rigorous study by economists Dr. Randall Pozdena and Dr. Eric Fruits, was published by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) today.  The report takes a deep theoretical and empirical dive into both state and national tax policy debunking several myths along the way.

Myth number one is the notion that “increased government spending stimulates the economy during recessions.”  Messrs Pozdena and Fruits review the academic literature in order to debunk this common myth.  At the national level they find:

A large and long-standing body of literature finds that increased or higher government spending tends to reduce economic growth rather than increase it. This negative relationship between prior levels of high spending and growth is apparent in the data from developed nations (See Figure 3). 

Looking at the state level a similar conclusion is found; higher government spending correlates with slower economic growth:

Studies comparing the growth rates of various states with different levels of public sector spending also fail to identify consistent evidence that demonstrates how public spending increases a state’s rate of economic growth. This is particularly the case when the spending is on transfer payments, but it is ambiguous even when spending is on more productive items, such as education, health and infrastructure. 

Figure 4 shows that states that have a history of high rates of total government spending growth (per dollar of Gross State Product [GSP]) subsequently display much lower rates of GDP growth. This is suggestive of a causal relationship between fiscal profligacy and subsequent slow growth.
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