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An event to define the scope and possible solutions to Wichita's long-term water challenges.


Examining Wichita's Water Future
An event to define the scope and possible solutions to Wichita's long-term water challenges.
Mon, 21 Jul 2014 16:07:44 +0000
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“'We’re just trying to get all of these different perspectives in the same room and not in a debate format. We want to talk about if there is a problem, what is the scope of the problem and what are some possible solutions,'” said James Franko, vice president and policy director for KPI."

http://www.kansas.com/2014/07/15/3553660/community-forum-planned-on-future.html#storylink=cpy

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER: http://kansaspolicy.org/events/118507.aspx?view=c


Community forum planned on future of Wichita’s water | Wichita Eagle
www.kansas.com
The Kansas Policy Institute, a conservative Wichita nonprofit organization, is hosting a community forum about Wichita’s water future from 8 a.m. to noon on Thursday at the Wichita State Metropolitan Complex, Room 132, according to a news release.
Tue, 15 Jul 2014 16:00:24 +0000
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What are the solutions to Wichita's water challenges? Next Thursday in Wichita attend a free event to find out. Wichita city officials, Kansas Water Office, and other experts discuss.

http://kansaspolicy.org/Events/118507.aspx?view=c


Wichita Water Conference
www.kansaspolicy.org
State experts, the City of Wichita, and local leaders will gather to explore scope of Wichita's water needs and possible solutions. Confirmed speakers: Kansas Water Office, City Councilman Pete Meitzner, Wichita Dir. of Public Works Alan King,
Wed, 09 Jul 2014 18:22:06 +0000
Last Refreshed 7/23/2014 3:18:37 PM
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Kansas' Unemployment Rate - The Good and The Bad
Posted by Todd Davidson on Tuesday, December 11, 2012
If only we could derive our economic health by looking solely at the unemployment rate.  This simplistic view certainly has its perks – namely our economy would be easier to understand – unfortunately, without knowing the unemployment rate can decline for adverse reasons one can be misled into thinking some unhealthy economies are healthy.

The Unemployment Rate = (Number of Unemployed Persons)/(Labor force) – that is, if a state has 5 unemployed individuals and 100 people in the labor force the unemployment rate is 5%.

Mathematically the unemployment rate can decline three ways:

  1. The Number of Unemployed Persons declines while the Labor Force is unchanged or increases (Good)
  2. The Number of Unemployed Persons remains unchanged or decreases while the Labor Force increases (Good)
  3. Unemployed declines at least as fast as the Labor Force declines (Probably Bad)

#1 and #2 are good because new jobs were created.  #3 is bad because the unemployed person just gave up (or moved to another state).  Complicating the matter further, depending on which time frame is chosen; one can see all three instances.  In order to determine if jobs were created we need look at the change in the number of employed.  

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics from September 2012 to October 2012 the number of employed persons increased from 1,396,552 to 1,400,956 in Kansas.  This means the unemployment rate dropped because jobs were created not because workers dropped out of the labor force.

Looking back further from October 2011 to October 2012 we see employment is actually down 7,725 jobs – meaning the unemployment rate is lower than 2011 because unemployed individuals dropped out of the labor force.  

That means we’re in situation #3 above – not good for the people who either given up looking for work or given up life in Kansas to seek a job elsewhere. It also is not good for the state as we have fewer people working, investing, living, and paying taxes in The Sunflower State.

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