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Are Kansas school districts spending all the tax money they've been given? How has this amount changed over time? Listen to learn more about the $884 million in carryover cash reserves held by Kansas school districts.


Kansas K-12 schools carryover cash reserves
kansaspolicyinstitute.podbean.com
Kansas school districts have been accumulating unspent taxpayer funds even as they call for increased funding. Kansas Policy Institute President Dave Trabert talks with podcast host Paul Soutar about these funds, how they got there, what they mean to the d...
Mon, 02 Mar 2015 21:06:59 +0000
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Maybe the "one more thing" to get City of Wichita- Government going really is the opportunity of a good paying job. Kenneth N. Ciboski KMUW


The Real 'One More Thing' For Wichita
kmuw.org
In my nearly 47 years in Wichita, I have observed that city leaders have focused on that “one more thing” they think would attract and keep people in
Thu, 26 Feb 2015 15:44:34 +0000
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Let's give more kids an option. Put kids and parents back in the driver's seat of their own future!


Rally for school choice in Kansas
wichitaliberty.org
Parents and children from around Kansas rallied in the Kansas Capitol for school choice.
Tue, 24 Feb 2015 19:06:09 +0000
Last Refreshed 3/3/2015 10:04:42 AM
KPIBlog
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Kansas' Unemployment Rate - The Good and The Bad
Posted by Todd Davidson on Tuesday, December 11, 2012
If only we could derive our economic health by looking solely at the unemployment rate.  This simplistic view certainly has its perks – namely our economy would be easier to understand – unfortunately, without knowing the unemployment rate can decline for adverse reasons one can be misled into thinking some unhealthy economies are healthy.

The Unemployment Rate = (Number of Unemployed Persons)/(Labor force) – that is, if a state has 5 unemployed individuals and 100 people in the labor force the unemployment rate is 5%.

Mathematically the unemployment rate can decline three ways:

  1. The Number of Unemployed Persons declines while the Labor Force is unchanged or increases (Good)
  2. The Number of Unemployed Persons remains unchanged or decreases while the Labor Force increases (Good)
  3. Unemployed declines at least as fast as the Labor Force declines (Probably Bad)

#1 and #2 are good because new jobs were created.  #3 is bad because the unemployed person just gave up (or moved to another state).  Complicating the matter further, depending on which time frame is chosen; one can see all three instances.  In order to determine if jobs were created we need look at the change in the number of employed.  

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics from September 2012 to October 2012 the number of employed persons increased from 1,396,552 to 1,400,956 in Kansas.  This means the unemployment rate dropped because jobs were created not because workers dropped out of the labor force.

Looking back further from October 2011 to October 2012 we see employment is actually down 7,725 jobs – meaning the unemployment rate is lower than 2011 because unemployed individuals dropped out of the labor force.  

That means we’re in situation #3 above – not good for the people who either given up looking for work or given up life in Kansas to seek a job elsewhere. It also is not good for the state as we have fewer people working, investing, living, and paying taxes in The Sunflower State.

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